AOE SADATSUGU / KASHU NAGATSUGU DAISHO

late kamakura period & early edo period

NTHK-NPO Certificates

 

 

Katana (dai)

Swordsmith: Den Bitchu, Aoe SADATSUGU (unsigned, attribution)

Period: Kamakura, early Genko era (1331-1333)

Location: Bitchu province (Okayama prefecture)

Measurements: Length: 66.8cm (o-suriage) Curvature: 1.3cm

Meibun (inscription on nakago):

Osuriage mumei

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Shinogizukuri Iorimune

Shinogi-zukuri and Iorimune

Kitae (forge): Itame Tsumari Muneyori Utsuri Senmei

Tight wood grain pattern and Utsuri around Mune

Hamon (temper line): Futo-chu Suguha Komidare Ko-ashi

Futo-chu straight temper, ko-midare, and ko-ashi

Boshi (temper line at tip of the blade): Sugu ni Komaru

Straight and small round shape

Chokoku (engraving): Omote Ura Bohi Chushin Nakahodo De Kakinagashi

Grooves on both sides. Kakinagashi at the middle of nakago

Mekugi Ana (hole in nakago): 3

Yasurime (file marks on nakago): Katte-sagari

File mark angled to nakago

Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association)

 

Wakizashi (sho)

Swordsmith: Kashu ju Fujiwara NAGA [TSUGU] (largely signed)

Period: Jokyo era (1684-1688)

Location: Kashu province (Kaga prefecture)

Measurements: Length: 49.8cm (suriage) Curvature: 1.2cm

Meibun (inscription on nakago):

Kashu Ju Fujiwara Ika Kire

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Shinogizukuri Iorimune

Shinogi-zukuri and Iorimune

Kitae (forge): Itame Tsumu

Tight wood grain pattern

Hamon (temper line): Yaki Takame Gunome Midare Yakigashira Togari Kokoro Ari

High yaki, irregularly undulating temper line, and top of the temper line has pointy pattern

Boshi (temper line at tip of the blade): Sugu-cho ni Komaru Kaeri

Straight, small round shape, and curled back

Mekugi Ana (hole in nakago): 2

Yasurime (file marks on nakago): Sujikai

File mark angled to nakago

 

Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association)

Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a daisho koshirae, daisho fuchi-kashira and daisho tsuba all designated as Important by the Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association)

Included: Shirasaya, carry bags

 

 

The NTHK-NPO Kanteisho certificate attributes the katana to [second generation] Chu-Aoe School [Osumi Gonnosuke] Sadatsugu from the early Genko era (1331-1333) in the late
Kamakura period.

Gonnosuke is credited with Jojo-saku status by Fujishiro (a highly superior swordsmith) and produced good sharp swords with a sharpness rank of Ryo-Wazamono.

The Aoe School has long had a reputation for quality sword making since the 1200s. Several pieces from the Aoe School have achieved prestigious NBTHK Juyo Token certification and are
extremely valuable. The school can be divided in the Ko-Aoe (late Heian period to mid-Kamakura) Chu-Aoe (late Kamakura to Nambokucho) and Sue-Aoe (Muromachi period).

Swords from the early Koto-period have a definitive look and feel - very different to swords from the Edo period post 1600. The steel, the balance, the overall energy-level is unique.

Many scholars such as WM Hawley believe that it came down to the quality of the sand iron found in stream beds where the grinding action of rocks for countless ages had reduced the ore
to almost pure iron. This was considered the best material for swords and the Bizen area was famous for such raw material.

One aspect in Koto-period swords made in the Bizen area is the presence of utsuri (a shadow-like reflection) above the hamon (temper line). The katana is blessed with such midare utsuri running along the attractive tsumari itame-hada (tight wood grain steel pattern).

As with the majority Aoe School swords the hamon of the katana is based on suguha (straight temper line) with an added dimension of ko-midare (small undulations) and ko-ashi (small legs) extending out to the cutting edge. There is an air of elegance to admire in the sword.

The wakizashi is was crafted and signed during the Shinto period, in approximately 1684. Swordsmith Nagatsugu was from Kaga province, which was the richest domain after the Tokugawa family in all of Japan. Nagatsugu was clearly inspired by Koto-period forging techniques and it shows in the hataraki (activity) of the steel.

Both swords share a general commonality in their appearance, which gives the two swords sense of visual unity. It’s no accident why these swords were paired up with one another.

An exquisite set of matching fittings forms the daisho. From snarling dragons on the tsubas, to beautiful falling snowflakes under the night sky wrapping the fuchi-kashiras, and protective shisa lions on the menuki, kozuka (utility knife) and kogai (hair pick) – everything works in splendid harmony. The gold trim on the tsubas is a particularly smart touch.

On display, these swords look absolutely incredible…

Along with the two certificates of authenticity for the swords, three additional certificates for the daisho tsubas (guards), the daisho fuchi-kashira (collar/pommel) and the daisho koshirae will accompany the lot.

 

 

Katana ~ Dai

 

Wakizashi ~ Sho

 

 

 

Certificates & translation

Issue No: 6851

Certificate of Designation

One, Katana Koshirae

Kuro Ishime Ji Nuri Daisho Uchi Katana Koshirae

Shoshin (authentic)

Issued in 27th year of Heisei (2015), October 18th

The Nihon Token Hozon Kai (NTHK-NPO)

The Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association

Chairman of the Board, Teiji Miyano

Back Page:

Mumei (unsigned)

Sunpo (length):

98.2 cm (Dai) and 73.5 cm (Sho)

Koshirae (sword fittings):

Tsuka (hilt): Sirasame-gi Kuro-ito Hishi-maki-e

White ray skin wrapped base traditionally weaved with black silk

Fuchikashira (collar/pommel): Shakudo Ishimeji Kinzogan Yuki Kamon

Shakudo, stone pattern finish, gold inlay, and snow flake crest design

Menuki (decorative grips): Dai Katachibori Shikie Nihiki Shishi Zu Sho Shishi botan Zu

Dai: High relief engraving and two tigers design

Sho: Tiger and peony design

Tsuba (handle guard): Tetuji Boke Gata Ryo Takabori Shikie Un-Ryu Zu

Iron, Japanese quince shape, two holes for kogai and kozuka, high relief engraving, and

dragon/cloud design

Notes:

Crafted during Kinsei period (1989-)

Issue No: 6853

Certificate of Designation

One, Daisho Tsuba

Den Hizen, Jakushi

Shoshin (authentic)

Issued in 27th year of Heisei (2015), October 18th

The Nihon Token Hozon Kai (NTHK-NPO)

The Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association

Chairman of the Board, Teiji Miyano

Back Page:

Mumei (unsigned)

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Daisho Tomo Boke Gata Ryo Kata Hou Ume

Dai/Sho: Japanese quince shape and two holes with one hole mounted

Shitaji (material): Tetsu Zui Me Ji Uchikaeshi Mimi Shikie

Hammered pattern iron and edge is curled

Zugara (design): Dai Un-Ryu Ni Bonji Sho Houju

Dai: Dragon/cloud/bonji design

Sho: Jewel design

Hori (engraving): Takabori Konjikie

High relief engraving and gold design

Sunpo (measurement):

Dai: Length: 8.4cm, Width: 7.8cm

Sho: Length: 7.7cm, Width: 7.1cm

Note:

Crafted during middle Edo period (1692-1779).

 

Issue No: 6852

Certificate of Designation

One, Fuchikashira

Den Mutsu, Sendai Kiyosada

Shoshin (authentic)

Issued in 27th year of Heisei (2015), October 18th

The Nihon Token Hozon Kai (NTHK-NPO)

The Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association

Chairman of the Board, Teiji Miyano

Back Page:

Mumei (unsigned)

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Fuchikashira

fuchikashira

Shitaji (material): Shakudo Ishime Ji Sho Fuchigane

Shakudo, stone pattern finish, small gold on the edge

Zugara (design): Yuki Kamon

Snow flake crest pattern

Hori (engraving): Kinzogan

Gold inlay

Sunpo (measurement):

Dai length: 3.8cm Sho length: 2.1cm

Note:

Crafted during late Edo period (1780-1867)

 

Issue No: 6692

Certificate of Designation

One, Katana

Den Bichu, Aoe Sadatsugu

Shoshin (authentic)

Nagasa (length)

2 Shaku 2 Sun koreari

(66.8 cm)

Issued in 27th year of Heisei (2015), July 12nd

The Nihon Token Hozon Kai (NTHK-NPO)

The Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association

Chairman of the Board, Teiji Miyano

Back Page:

Meibun (inscription on nakago):

Osuriage mumei

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Shinogizukuri Iorimune

Shinogi-zukuri and Iorimune

Kitae (forge): Itame Tsumari Muneyori Utsuri Senmei

Tight wood grain pattern and Utsuri around Mune

Hamon (temper line): Futo-chu Suguha Komidare Ko-ashi

Futo-chu straight temper, ko-midare, and ko-ashi

Boshi (temper line at tip of the blade): Sugu ni Komaru

Straight and small round shape

Chokoku (engraving): Omote Ura Bohi Chushin Nakahodo De Kakinagashi

Grooves on both sides. Kakinagashi at the middle of nakago

Mekugi Ana (hole in nakago): 3

Yasurime (file marks on nakago): Katte-sagari

File mark angled to nakago

Notes:

Crafted during early Genkou era. (1331-1333)

 

 

Issue No: 6693

Certificate of Designation

One, Wakizashi

Den Kashu, Nagatsugu

Shoshin (authentic)

Nagasa (length)

1 Shaku 6 Sun 2 Bu koreari

(49.0 cm)

Issued in 27th year of Heisei (2015), July 12nd

The Nihon Token Hozon Kai (NTHK-NPO)

The Non-Profit Japanese Sword Appraisal Association

Chairman of the Board, Teiji Miyano

Back Page:

Meibun (inscription on nakago):

Kashu Ju Fujiwara Ika Kire

Tsukurikomi (style of forging): Shinogizukuri Iorimune

Shinogi-zukuri and Iorimune

Kitae (forge): Itame Tsumu

Tight wood grain pattern

Hamon (temper line): Yaki Takame Gunome Midare Yakigashira Togari Kokoro Ari

High yaki, irregularly undulating temper line, and top of the temper line has pointy pattern

Boshi (temper line at tip of the blade): Sugu-cho ni Komaru Kaeri

Straight, small round shape, and curled back

Mekugi Ana (hole in nakago): 2

Yasurime (file marks on nakago): Sujikai

File mark angled to nakago

Notes:

Crafted during early Joukyou era. (1684-1687)

For Inquires: Purchasing or additional information, Please e-mail or Contact us @ 1(608) 315-0083 any time
 

back...